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Interview with Torpedo’s Thiel

Interview with Torpedo’s Thiel

Today I had the chance to do a little interview with Torpedo’s Thiel, we talked about esports, idols and the future. Thiel has been playing Paladins competitively for Torpedo for the past seven months. His recent achievements include winning the first two European Summer Circuit tourneys and scoring a 3rd/4th place at Dreamhack summer during the Paladins Founders Tournament.
 
Q: Hey Thiel! To start off, can you introduce yourself?
A: Hi, my name is Thiel. I’m a competitive gamer. I’ve been playing Paladins since November and have been playing for Torpedo since December. I’m 23 years old and born and raised in Amsterdam. Currently studying MSc: Information Studies
 
Q: How did you get into competitive gaming? Have you played other games competitively?
A: Honestly I never really got into just competitive gaming. I’ve got this good and bad nature of competing at everything I do whether it’s playing games, work, college, fitness, or even riding my bike home – making sure no-one overtakes me. I might be the embodiment of the term “try-hard” when it comes to anything in life. The reason I got into competitive gaming is mostly due to gaming really taking off in my generation. With games likes Age of Empires, Total Annihilation, Pokemon, Quake, Worms, and SSBM/etc., I got sucked into the world of gaming and decided I liked my stay. As for other games I’ve played competitively, the only ones I have really shined bright at were: L4D2 and GunZ, also having spent most my time on them. Since I started I’ve actually kept track of my competitive achievements.
 
Q: Is there someone you look up to? Another pro gamer or just someone you admire?
A: There are far too many pro gamers that I admire that I would like to mention. Often times, the way I learn a game and improve myself is by watching how the respective game’s professionals do it. I try my best to copy their play style and habits and, in time, branch out to my own style from there. Basically I would copy their craft and then improve on it from there. Obviously this isn’t that easy, or I’d be playing for NiP right now, but it does give huge boosts to how good you are. Paladins didn’t really have any professionals (or players even, when I started back in alpha/day 1 beta) but a lot of soft- and hard skills still carry over from other games.
 
If I had to mention one pro gamer though, it’d be Fatal1ty or Mang0. Fatal1ty got the younger me interested to compete, and Mang0 is one of the most committed players to one game I’ve ever seen (and is also absolutely insane at it).
 
Q: If it wasn’t for your professional gaming career, what would you be doing right now?
A: If it wasn’t for professional gaming I would almost certainly be doing what I’m doing now, but full-time. I currently work as a BI consultant which is pretty fun, but I only do it part-time due to college and gaming. If it wasn’t for the gaming I would definitely go all in on that and also travel a lot more. I’ve been to 32 countries so far so, and can’t wait to make it a lot more. But honestly, professional gaming is what I currently live for, everything I do, I do to support that; and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
 
Q: What is your favourite champion in paladins and why? Are there any others you like?
A: DPS Carries! Specifically Cassie and Androxus. DPS Carries tend to do extremely well when played properly but when you don’t play them properly, they just become punching bags. The thin line between really high value plays and doing absolutely nothing makes it so exciting to play. They really force you to be on top of your game; and the smaller the room for failure, the more I tend to enjoy it. The reason I love Cassie and Androxus so much is because they can be played effectively at long, mid and short-range making them very flexible which allows for cute strategies.
 
Q: What are some tricks most people don’t know about in paladins?
A: Jumping and mounting at the same time! It allows for so much more manoeuvrability. Another one would be all the cheeky jump spots that you can do. (KAMI0889 made a great video covering many of them on Youtube).
 
Q: In your eyes, what makes a good player a great player?
A:We define a good player as a player that has great mechanical skills, such as aim and using the skills properly – a great player would be one with, as dubbed by our coach, great macro skills: game sense. Knowing where your team and where the enemy team is at all times and understanding what your position/actions should be to make the highest value plays. If we look at competitive play – it’s all about teamwork and communication. You want your entire team to be on the same page in regard to the point-by-point strategy and you need the communication to be calm, clean and precise.
 
Q: If there was one champion you could remove, who would it be and why?
A: Fernando. His current kit makes him either underpowered of overpowered in competitive play. Right now he’s underpowered, but I loathe the day Hi-Rez decides to buff him making him overpowered again. When overpowered, his kit makes him too easy to play well with so much room for errors that just can’t be punished properly.
 
Q: What are your hopes and dreams for the future of paladins and your esports career?
A: To become even harder, better, faster and stronger! There’s always room for improvement and I hope that I never forget that and keep on grinding.
 
Q: Would you like to mention anything else?
A:Big shout out to Torpedo for their support over the last 7 months, they have been very supportive and fun to hang around. And of course, my teammates for creating such a fun environment to play and compete in.

PaladinsWorld Head Editor & Website Administrator. I always end up being a Jack of All Trades. 18 years old, German roots.

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